The stars are dead but their light lives on

Fiona Annis, The stars are dead but their light lives on installation view of Eastern Bloc 2013 production residency

Fiona Annis, The stars are dead but their light lives on installation view of Eastern Bloc 2013 production residency

Fiona Annis, The stars are dead but their light lives on installation view Gallery 44, image by Alvin Luong

The stars are dead but their light lives on

Friday, March 27, 2015 to Saturday, April 18, 2015
Opening Reception
March 27,
6:00PM to 8:00PM
Brunch Talk
March 28,
12:00PM to 2:00PM
About the Exhibition: 

Artist Statement:

Common threads in my work include the use of instructions, time-based media, and esoteric technologies. This is paired with an ongoing interest in how the past inhabits the present. In this respect, the prefix re is in constant use: return, revenant, remediate, reinvent, and residue all reoccur in the writings that describe my various projects.

The stars are dead but their light lives on reflects the impulse to scavenge amongst obsolete technologies and to re-animate these dated apparatuses with the after-image of dead stars. In a dark exhibition space live data processing triggers countless lightbulbs to the rhythms of exploding supernova, and the sounds of stars being swallowed by black holes slowly erodes the slick surface of magnetic audiotape. The exhibition engages in the interpretation of specialist knowledge and the potential of repurposing archival stock.

Artist Biography: 

Fiona Annis is a Montréal-based visual artist and researcher whose practice emphasizes the use of scores and time-based media. Fiona has presented her work at The AC Institute (New York City), The Canadian Centre for Architecture (Montréal) Goldsmith's University (London), LowSalt Gallery (Glasgow), and The Art Gallery of Alberta (Edmonton). Her work has been published in BlackFlash Magazine, Front: Contemporary Art & Ideas, and Imagining Science, winner of the New York Book Show Award. Fiona recently completed a six-month residency at The Center for Alternative Photography in New York City, and currently teaches at Concordia University.

Writer: 
Nives Hajdin is a Toronto-based art writer and curator. She holds an MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice from OCAD University. Her thesis examined the effects of social surveillance in contemporary society, and her curatorial interests include urban interventions in alternative public spaces. Her writing has appeared in Canadian Art, C Magazine, and publications for Xpace Cultural Centre and Waddington’s Auctioneers and Appraisers. She has an upcoming publication in The Journal of Curatorial Studies and was the Publication Coordinator for Luis Jacob’s anthology, Commerce by Artists (Toronto: Art Metropole, 2011). niveshajdin.com